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This Day in Cardinals History
October 1st

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6 Fact(s) Found
1946 The Dodgers and Cardinals, who both finished the season with a 96-58 record, play the first game of a best-of-three series to determine the National League’s championship, marking the first time in major league history a playoff is needed to send a team to the World Series. St. Louis wins today's Sportsman's Park contest, 4-2, and will clinch the pennant in Game 2, beating the Brooklyn at Ebbets Field, 8-4.
1955 The Sporting News select Cardinal outfielder Bill Virdon and Indian fireballer Herb Score as the Rookie of the Year of their respective leagues. The Redbird flychaser, easily identified by his eyeglasses, receives 57 of the 92 writers' votes to get NL nod, while the Tribe's 22 year-old right-hander, who compiled a 16-10 record while establishing a freshman record for strikeouts with 245, garners 71 of 103 ballots cast for the Junior Circuit honors.
1964 In the event of a tie at the end of the season, National League president Warren Giles flips a coin to determine the different possible playoff pairings, which includes six possibilities - two with two teams, three with three teams, and one with four teams. Reds' president and general manager Bill DeWitt wins the first toss and chooses to play the Cardinals at home if Cincinnati prevails.
1978 On the last day of the season at Qualcomm Stadium, Ozzie Smith does his signature flip for the first time. The Padres shortstop, asked by the club to do it for Fans Appreciation Day, will continue his gymnastic prowess as a member of the Cardinals, with the somersault becoming an Opening Day tradition at Busch Stadium in St. Louis.

2000 In the season finale, Kazuhiro Sasaki sets the rookie record for saves by notching his 37th when he tosses 1.2 innings of scoreless relief in the Mariners' 5-2 victory over Los Angeles at Edison Field. The 32 year-old Japanese closer surpasses Todd Worrell's mark established in 1986 when the right-handed reliever played for the Cardinals.
2009 Tony La Russa moves past John McGraw into second place for the most games managed in major league history. With his 4,770 contests as a manager, the Cardinal skipper trails only Connie Mack, who amassed a total of 7755 during his 53 years in the dugout.

6 Fact(s) Found